Sew Must Go On: Saltspring in Blue

While it may look like I have only been sewing and crafting baby stuff, I have in fact managed to eek out a few projects for myself. As cute as the baby gear is, one has to make a few selfish projects every now and then and I know that as a blog reader if you’re not in the same baby stage as me, the baby stuff gets exceedingly boring. So here we have the first of me trying to showcase the non-baby projects I’ve been working on. The biggest challenge I have found is actually getting pictures of the projects because inevitably a baby will be escaping from a stroller or screaming her lungs out right in the middle of the photo shoot. I’m also working 4 days a week now so time is very limited and the household is chaotic. But the ‘Sew Must Go On!’.

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For a while now I have been really impressed with Sewaholic’s patterns and really enjoyed the Renfrew tops that I made here and here. I was also inspired by all the gorgeous Saltspring dresses that I saw around (like Amy from Sew Well’s Blooming Saltspring in Blue). So I ordered the Saltspring pattern a while ago but needless to say it remained untouched for a long time until now.

The fabric I got on a trip to San Francisco a few years ago and I think I bought it under the illusion that it was silk but I’m pretty sure it’s not (given the price and the establishment where I found it). I did also try the burn test to check if it burned or melted – is this a conclusive silk vs acrylic test?  Any way, I liked the big bold blue print and it feels lovely and silky.

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I took a it of time trying to get the pattern placement right – note ‘heart’ on my chest and centered patterns on the skirt – that’s no accident and I’m amazed it turned out! Cutting out the pattern in a silky fabric is never easy and always a bit fiddly but i got it done in the end and my sewing machine seemed to handle the fabric like a star. I did assist in using a microtex sharp needle.

I like how the dress came together and I love that it has pockets! The billowy bodice is also better than I expected and the neckline is a nice cut without being too revealing. One thing I should’ve done (and I wish I had reread Amy’s post before I started the dress as she suggested it) was to leave out the back zipper. I can get into the dress without the zipper (the waist is elasticized) and I think it makes the back sit weirdly and not lie nicely. I suppose I could remove it and just sew up the seam but that will have to be a project for another day.

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(I think this photo is where I noticed Twin B launching herself out of the stroller and the photo shoot came to an abrupt end).

I am hoping to get some wear out of this dress before the weather turns too cold although I have realised that maxi dresses are not that conducive to having small children because they grab the dress and you have no hands to hold up the bottom when you’re climbing stairs etc. And grubby paws don’t go well with silky fabrics. All these things I never knew!

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Pattern: Sewaholic’s Saltspring

Fabric: Silky satin from a store in San Francisco

Alterations: None; but I should’ve left the back zipper out

Do it again: Hopefully. Maybe a short one next summer…

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Nappy factory

For a long time (ie many years before the girls were born), I had thinking about, researching and even buying supplies to make my own modern cloth nappies (MCNs) – diapers for you yanks out there.     

 
I know it’s a bit of a weird thing to have dedicated so much creative energy to way before I could even use such things, but I was intrigued and quickly became committed to the idea for environmental, cost and health benefits. Also I think the modern cloth nappies you can get these days are so much cuter than disposables. When I discovered I was having twins I still wasn’t deterred even though people thought I was crazy and made comments like:  “You must really love doing laundry!”. But the challenge was set and I embraced it whole heartedly. 

I did lots of online research on patterns and fabrics and made a bunch of prototypes before the girls arrived. Then once I had actual models I could tweak designs and figure out what worked best for us. Once I had a pattern that I liked I spurge do on some awesome outer fabrics (waterproof PUL) and made about 12 nappies that are still in every day use. 

   

Each time I hang up a load of clean nappies I think: “Another pile of nappies that didn’t go to landfill – yay!”.  

Ps I realise that I may need to do another post on nappies with more of the technical details…for now just enjoy the pics!